Historic in Ha Noi

Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long

The Imperial Citadel of Thang Long (VietnameseHoàng thành Thăng Long) is the cultural complex comprising the royal enclosure first built during the Lý Dynasty and subsequently expanded by the Trần and finally the Nguyễn Dynasty. The ruins roughly coincide with the Hanoi Citadel today.

The royal palaces and most of the structures in Thang Long were in varying states of disrepair by the late 19th century with the upheaval of the French conquest of Hanoi. By the 20th century many of the remaining structures were torn down. Only in the 21st century are the ruin foundations of Thang Long Imperial City systematically excavated.

The central sector of the imperial citadel was listed in UNESCO‘s World Heritage Site on July 31, 2010 at its session in Brazil.

(Wikipedia)

Unesco:

Central Sector of the Imperial Citadel of Thang Long – Hanoi

Hung Vuong St. and Hoang Van Thu St., Hanoi, Vietnam

The Presidential Palace of Vietnam, located in the city of Hanoi, was built between 1900 and 1906 to house the French Governor-General of Indochina.

t was constructed by Auguste Henri Vildieu, the official French architect for French Indochina. Like most French Colonial architecture, the palace is pointedly European. The only visual cues that it is located in Vietnam at all are mango trees growing on the grounds.

The yellow palace stands behind wrought iron gates flanked by sentry boxes. It incorporates elements of Italian Renaissance design, including:

aedicules
a formal piano nobile reached by a grand staircase
broken pediments
classical columns
quoins
When Vietnam achieved independence in 1954, Ho Chi Minh was claimed to have refused to live in the grand structure for symbolic reasons, although he still received state guests there, he eventually built a traditional Vietnamese stilt house and carp pond on the grounds. His house and the grounds were made into the Presidential Palace Historical Site in 1975.

The palace hosts government meetings. It is not open to the public, although one may walk around the grounds for a fee.

The Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum is located nearby the palace.

Dien Bien Phu

May 7, 1954 proved to be a pivotal day in Vietnamese history; it was the day when French colonial forces were defeated in the battle of Dien Bien Phu, marking the final days of the First Indochina War. The small, walkable town of Dien Bien Phu has since attracted military buffs who come to see the refurbished French defenses, including a command bunker, a strong point and a military history museum.
What really makes the place special, even for visitors with less of an interest in history, is the sense of remoteness, nestled in a valley amid the lush mountains along the Laos border. The spectacular hillside rice terraces in the countryside surrounding the town are worth a visit on their own.

73 P Quan Su, Hanoi, Vietnam

Quan Su Temple was built in the 15th century under the Lê Dynasty. At that time there was no Buddhist temple here but some cottages used as a place of worship. According to Hoàng Lê nhất thống chí, during Emperor Le The Tong’s reign, Chiem Thanh (Champa), Ai Lao (Laos) usually sent ambassadors to offer tributes to Đại Việt (official name of Viet Nam under the Lê Dynasty). The Emperor ordered to construct a building called Quan Su (Embassy) to receive foreign ambassadors to Thăng Long. Because those ambassadors were all Buddhist, they decided to build a temple on the premises for worship. Today only the temple remains.

According to Doctor Le Duy Trung’s essay carved on the 1855 stele, the temple was close to Hau Quan Base in the early years of Gia Long Era (1802–1819). In 1822, the temple was renovated so that the local residents could practise worship here. When the troops withdrew, the temple was returned to the villagers. Monk Thanh Phuong, who hosted the temple then, had corridors built, statues painted, bell made. The front palace is dedicated to the Buddha and the rear palace is dedicate to Master Minh Khong of the Lý Dynasty.

(Wikipedia)

St Joseph’s Cathedral (Nha Tho Lon), hanoi

Saint Joseph Cathedral, located at 40 Nha Chung street, Hanoi, is a Roman Catholic cathedral with neo- gothic style, which was built about 120 years ago.
Saint Joseph Cathedral, located at 40 Nha Chung street, Hanoi, is a Roman Catholic cathedral with neo- gothic style, which was built about 120 years ago.
History and Architecture
In 1882, after the French army conquered Hanoi, the cathedral was constructed and completed in 1886. The cathedral and Nha Chung area were built on the land formerly belonging to Bao Thien pagoda, which was built under Ly dynasty.
The architecture with domes of the cathedral follows the Gothic style and design of Paris Cathedral. It is 64.5m in length, 20.5m in width with two bell towers of 31.5m-height. Though the appearance of the cathedral, from the doors, the colorful window glass, to the religious paintings for decoration follows Western style, the main interior part is decorated in Vietnamese way with two typical colors yellow and red. Outside, in front of the cathedral is the statue of Mother Maria.
Christmas celebration
The first Christmas took place in the cathedral in 1887. Since then, the cathedral is always crowded with hundreds of people including both Christians and non-Christians at the weekend or during religious holidays like Christmas.